VACUUM SCIENCE BLOG

Everything you need to know about screw pumps

Screw pumps belong to the family of dry compressing gas transfer pumps. (Learn more about the origins of dry pumps here) They are positive-displacement pumps that use two screw shaped intermeshing rotors to move gas along the screw’s axis. They are frequently used in industrial vacuum applications, often in combination with roots blowers and as oil-free roughing pumps in high and ultrahigh vacuum systems.

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Nearly Zero Energy Buildings conference summary

On 28 August 2019, Vacuum Science World contributor Dr Saim Memon hosted an international, one-day conference on Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (NZEBs) at London South Bank University.

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Seven factors affecting the sensitivity of vacuum gauges

In terms of engineering and science, it is hard to over emphasise the importance of measurements. They are the very essence of these two disciplines, which we use to explain the otherwise unexplainable with equations, tables, graphs and figures. In turn, this allows us to compare, contrast, repeat and define the apparent chaos which defines our world.

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Residual Gas Analysers (RGA) explained

What is a residual gas analyser?

A residual gas analyser (RGA) is a small and usually rugged quadrupole mass spectrometer, typically designed for environment analysis, process control and contamination monitoring in vacuum systems. RGAs can monitor the quality of the vacuum by detecting (and measuring) minute traces of impurities in a low-pressure gaseous environment. RGAs can also be used as sensitive in-situ leak detectors, usually using helium.

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Vacuum bake out: its importance and implementation

The presence of gaseous molecules, whether slow or fast moving, is what gives rise to pressure. A vacuum is created by reducing the number of molecules that exist within, for example, a chamber or a flask. However, by reducing the number of molecules that exert a pressure on the internal surface of such a chamber, one reduces the pressure. Unfortunately, this causes “additional” molecules to enter into play.

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The importance of gas ballast for vacuum pumps

When pumping atmospheric air (or gas) in a vacuum system, however “pure” it may appear to be, it will invariably contain some vapour.

During the compression process in the pump , this vapour will condense. Failure to remove it will form a contaminant which will prevent the pump from achieving its optimum vacuum pressure. Also, the condensate can enter the pump’s mechanism, for example the oil in oil-sealed rotary pumps, where, as a contaminant, it can have a detrimental effect.

In simple terms, a gas ballast valve incorporated into the system will allow a flow of air into the final part of the compression cycle and allow the vapour to be expelled without condensation or affecting the pump's overall performance.

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The limitations of achieving UHV with turbomolecular vacuum pumps

There are several types of pumps that can deliver high and ultra-high vacuum pressures; diffusion pumps, cryo pumps; ion getter pumps (IGP); titanium sublimation pumps (TSP); non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps; and turbomolecular pumps (TMP).

The methods whereby these pumps are capable of producing high and ultra-high vacuum pressures (between 10-3 and 10-11 mbar) are either by momentum transfer of gas molecules or by capturing them (either physically or chemically).

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Everything you need to know about scroll pumps

In the world of vacuum systems, scroll pumps hold a valuable place as one of the few pumps that are traditionally employed in low (i.e. 1000 mbar to 1 mbar) and medium (i.e. 1 mbar to 10-3 mbar) systems, and yet are now also frequently being employed as fore (or backing) pumps in high and ultra-high (i.e. 10-3 to 10-12 mbar) vacuum systems.

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Vacuum system calculation and simulation services

Vacuum simulation (or modelling) is an essential part of vacuum system design. It is now a well-established practice and is primarily concerned with the prediction and calculation of how vacuum pumps and systems will perform in specific scenarios.

These simulations enable engineers to identify anomalies in the design stage and acquire the right components, rather than building a vacuum system that later needs to be redesigned.

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International Conference on Vacuum Insulation for NZEBs

Sharing knowledge and expertise on all things vacuum science and technology is our foundation. We are delighted to share this opportunity to learn from international researchers and innovators in the Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation community at the International Conference on Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings.

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