VACUUM SCIENCE BLOG

Entries related to: industrial-process-vacuum

Food waste at record high – how vacuum technologies help reduce waste

According to a report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, at least one-third of food is lost or wasted between harvest and household. In North-America and Europe, this means more than 100 kg of food lost per capita – summing up to 1.3 billion tons annually worldwide! A reduction to this huge mass of food produced in vain would contribute greatly to reducing the greenhouse effect.

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Everything you need to know about screw pumps

Screw pumps belong to the family of dry compressing gas transfer pumps. They are positive-displacement pumps that use two screw shaped intermeshing rotors to move gas along the screw’s axis. They are frequently used in industrial vacuum applications, often in combination with roots blowers and as oil-free roughing pumps in high and ultrahigh vacuum systems.

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Nearly Zero Energy Buildings conference summary

On 28 August 2019, Vacuum Science World contributor Dr Saim Memon hosted an international, one-day conference on Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (NZEBs) at London South Bank University.

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Residual Gas Analysers (RGA) explained

What is a residual gas analyser?

A residual gas analyser (RGA) is a small and usually rugged quadrupole mass spectrometer, typically designed for environment analysis, process control and contamination monitoring in vacuum systems. RGAs can monitor the quality of the vacuum by detecting (and measuring) minute traces of impurities in a low-pressure gaseous environment. RGAs can also be used as sensitive in-situ leak detectors, usually using helium.

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The Working Principle of Multistage Roots Vacuum Pumps

Multistage roots pumps are dry vacuum pumps used in low, medium, high and ultra-high vacuum systems to produce “dry” conditions.

The simple (single-stage) roots pump is most commonly employed as a booster pump for several types of fore-pumps (such as rotary vane pumps, screw and liquid ring pumps) to improve ultimate pressure and pumping speeds. When multistage roots pumps are employed, no fore pump is required and they can operate from atmospheric pressure. Roots pumps are suitable where a dry and clean atmosphere is important or more likely essential. Consequently, they are frequently used in the manufacture of semiconductors and solar panels, as well as for coatings and other industrial applications.

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Working with turbomolecular vacuum pumps

working principle 

Turbomolecular pumps (TMPs) are kinetic vacuum pumps which operate using a very fast spinning rotor (usually rotating at between 24,000 and 90,000 RPM). Their typical operating pressures are in the high to ultra-high pressure range between 10-3 and 10-11 mbar, employing pumping speeds of between 10 and 4,000 l/s.

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How to find the right vacuum pump system for your lab work

Laboratory technicians and scientists regularly use vacuum pumps (frequently of the bench-top variety) for a range of tasks including aspirating/filtering, controlling or inducing solvent evaporation in concentrators, as well as in gel driers, vacuum ovens, desiccators and rotary evaporators.

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Eight top tips for working with oil-sealed rotary vane pumps

Rotary vane pumps are considered wet, positive displacement pumps, with the term “wet” denoting that the gases being pumped are exposed to oil. The significant characteristic of oil sealed rotary vane (OSRV) pumps is the use of oil as a sealant, which is not found in ‘dry’ pumps. 

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