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Entries related to: r-d

The Working Principle of Multistage Roots Vacuum Pumps

Multistage roots pumps are dry vacuum pumps used in low, medium, high and ultra-high vacuum systems to produce “dry” conditions. The simple (single-stage) roots pump is most commonly employed as a booster pump for several types of fore-pumps (such as rotary vane pumps, screw and liquid ring pumps) to improve ultimate pressure and pumping speeds. When multistage roots pumps are employed, no fore pump is required and they can operate from atmospheric pressure. Roots pumps are suitable where a dry and clean atmosphere is important or more likely essential. Consequently, they are frequently used in the manufacture of semiconductors and solar panels, as well as for coatings and other industrial applications.
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Vacuum system calculation and simulation services

Vacuum simulation (or modelling) is an essential part of vacuum system design. It is now a well-established practice and is primarily concerned with the prediction and calculation of how vacuum pumps and systems will perform in specific scenarios. These simulations enable engineers to identify anomalies in the design stage and acquire the right components, rather than building a vacuum system that later needs to be redesigned.
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International Conference on Vacuum Insulation for NZEBs

Sharing knowledge and expertise on all things vacuum science and technology is our foundation. We are delighted to share this opportunity to learn from international researchers and innovators in the Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation community at the International Conference on Renewable Energy and Vacuum Insulation for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings.
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Spotlight on: Gravitational Wave Detectors

Vacuum science has been integral to major scientific advancements. One of the most prominent of these is gravitational wave detectors. Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time that are caused by violent processes such as exploding stars, collisions between neutron stars or the merging of black holes – a concept predicted by Einstein’s theory of General Relativity in 1915.
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Choosing between different types of vacuum pumps

What do you need to consider when choosing vacuum pumps? Anyone without a deep understanding or knowledge of pumps might think that vacuum generation is simply a question of “plugging in a pump”, starting it up and waiting for the vacuum to drop to the required level.
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Understanding vacuum pressure measurement

When it comes to choosing a vacuum gauge, understanding the application and vacuum pressure measurement required is crucial to making the right choice. But while pressure measurement plays an important role in all vacuum applications, there’s no universal vacuum gauge that will respond accurately throughout the range from atmospheric pressure to 10-12 mbar.
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Working with turbomolecular vacuum pumps

working principle  Turbomolecular pumps (TMPs) are kinetic vacuum pumps which operate using a very fast spinning rotor (usually rotating at between 24,000 and 90,000 RPM). Their typical operating pressures are in the high to ultra-high pressure range between 10-3 and 10-11 mbar, employing pumping speeds of between 10 and 4,000 l/s.
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How to find the right vacuum pump system for your lab work

Laboratory technicians and scientists regularly use vacuum pumps (frequently of the bench-top variety) for a range of tasks including aspirating/filtering, controlling or inducing solvent evaporation in concentrators, as well as in gel driers, vacuum ovens, desiccators and rotary evaporators.
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Introduction to the fundamentals of vacuum science & technology

Described as ‘a space in which the pressure is below surrounding atmospheric pressure’, vacuum science is a subject and concept that has stimulated many great minds for millennia. The origins of vacuum science can be traced back to as early as the 4th century when Aristotle stated that ‘nature abhors a vacuum’. 
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ITER: Clean and sustainable energy (using vacuum vessels)

Energy from nuclear fusion must surely be the answer to the majority of the world’s on-going energy headaches. The fuels used in nuclear fusion are plentiful and readily available across the world. There are absolutely no greenhouse gas emissions and - unlike even the most up-to-date nuclear energy programmes - not only are there no long-term radioactive wastes to deal with, but the reactors cannot “run out of control”.
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