VACUUM SCIENCE BLOG

Entries related to: ultra high vacuum

Do You Need an Onsite or Offsite Backup Vacuum Pump?

From small-scale experiments to large industrial production lines, vacuum pump failure can force your project into downtime — leading to missed deadlines and revenue loss. For many organisations, sourcing an onsite or offsite backup pump is crucial to safeguarding projects. 

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Four basic rules for working under HV and UHV conditions

When working with high vacuum (HV) and ultra-high vacuum (UHV), there are specific aspects to consider to ensure an efficient and safe system.

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New UHV/XHV pumps at ALBA Synchrotron & Argonne Laboratory

In this blog post, we share some recent installations of UHV/XHV pump technologies in electron synchrotrons and how these special pumps perform.

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The Working Principle of Multistage Roots Vacuum Pumps

Fore vacuum pumps are defined as those which exhaust to atmospheric pressure. They are also required to support secondary pumps or to attain the initial conditions for their operation. There are two types of fore vacuum pumps:

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Key working principles of fore vacuum pumps

Fore vacuum pumps are defined as those which exhaust to atmospheric pressure. They are also required to support secondary pumps or to attain the initial conditions for their operation. There are two types of fore vacuum pumps:

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The key working principles of High and Ultra-High vacuum pumps

High Vacuum (HV) and Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) levels can only be effectively and efficiently obtained by using a main pump that has the functional capabilities. Choosing which pump to use depends on a number of factors, such as noise/vibration, cost (initial and on-going), tolerance to contamination, footprint, maintenance schedules, and resilience to shock.

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How cryopumps work: a detailed guide on their use

 

Cryopumps offer several advantages compared to other high-vacuum pumps. For instance, their pumping speed for water vapour is up to 4x higher than any other vacuum pump with the same inlet diameter. Furthermore, unlike gas transfer pumps, i.e. turbomolecular pumps or oil diffusion pumps, cryopumps condense all the gasses within them. The goal of this blog is to explain to you how they operate and where their capabilities are beneficial to the vacuum process. 

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Everything you need to know about screw pumps

Screw pumps belong to the family of dry compressing gas transfer pumps. (Learn more about the origins of dry pumps here) They are positive-displacement pumps that use two screw shaped intermeshing rotors to move gas along the screw’s axis. They are frequently used in industrial vacuum applications, often in combination with roots blowers and as oil-free roughing pumps in high and ultrahigh vacuum systems.

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Vacuum bake out: its importance and implementation

The presence of gaseous molecules, whether slow or fast moving, is what gives rise to pressure. A vacuum is created by reducing the number of molecules that exist within, for example, a chamber or a flask. However, by reducing the number of molecules that exert a pressure on the internal surface of such a chamber, one reduces the pressure. Unfortunately, this causes “additional” molecules to enter into play.

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The limitations of achieving UHV with turbomolecular vacuum pumps

There are several types of pumps that can deliver high and ultra-high vacuum pressures; diffusion pumps, cryo pumps; ion getter pumps (IGP); titanium sublimation pumps (TSP); non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps; and turbomolecular pumps (TMP).

The methods whereby these pumps are capable of producing high and ultra-high vacuum pressures (between 10-3 and 10-11 mbar) are either by momentum transfer of gas molecules or by capturing them (either physically or chemically).

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