VACUUM SCIENCE BLOG

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Entries related to: ultra-high-vacuum

Choosing between different types of vacuum pumps

What do you need to consider when choosing vacuum pumps? Anyone without a deep understanding or knowledge of pumps might think that vacuum generation is simply a question of “plugging in a pump”, starting it up and waiting for the vacuum to drop to the required level.
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Working with turbomolecular vacuum pumps

Working principle Turbomolecular pumps (TMPs) are kinetic vacuum pumps which operate using a very fast spinning rotor (usually rotating at between 24,000 and 90,000 RPM). Their typical operating pressures are in the high to ultra-high pressure range between 10-3 and 10-11 mbar, employing pumping speeds of between 10 and 4,000 l/s.
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Introduction to the fundamentals of vacuum science & technology

Described as ‘a space in which the pressure is below surrounding atmospheric pressure’, vacuum science is a subject and concept that has stimulated many great minds for millennia. The origins of vacuum science can be traced back to as early as the 4th century when Aristotle stated that ‘nature abhors a vacuum’. 
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ITER: Clean and sustainable energy (using vacuum vessels)

Energy from nuclear fusion must surely be the answer to the majority of the world’s on-going energy headaches. The fuels used in nuclear fusion are plentiful and readily available across the world. There are absolutely no greenhouse gas emissions and - unlike even the most up-to-date nuclear energy programmes - not only are there no long-term radioactive wastes to deal with, but the reactors cannot “run out of control”.
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The main CERN vacuum systems explained

The study of particle physics is conducted in machines known as particle accelerators (or particle colliders). These machines use huge electromagnetic fields to accelerate proton particles to velocities approaching the speed of light, focus them into a fine beam, and then monitor the matter that results from their collision with other particles.
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KATRIN experiment: Measuring the mass of a “ghost particle”

KATRIN (Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment) is a programme to measure the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, with sub-eV precision. This experimental work, which is taking place at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), will investigate one of neutrino physics’ most important, but still unanswered, questions: “What is the absolute mass of neutrinos?”
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